Rios and Ranchos

Nicholas Chennault ~ December 17, 2014

Rios and Ranchos–Westerns with Rio or Rancho in the Title

River Westerns (“Rio” or “River” in the title)
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Red River (1948)
Silver River (Flynn, 1948)
Massacre River (1949)
Rio Grande (1950) The best known is this one by John Ford. But there are several other Rio Grandes, including one with Gene Autry.
Bend of the River (1952)
The Siege at Red River (1953)
Border River (1954)
River of No Return (1954)
Many Rivers to Cross (1955)
Canyon River (1956)
Man from Del Rio (1956)
The River’s Edge (1957)
Rio Bravo (1959)
Rio Conchos (1964)
Texas Across the River (1966)
Rio Lobo (1970)
Red River (MfTV, 1988)
The Man from Snowy River (1982)
Return to Snowy River (1988)
Rio Diablo (MfTV, 1993)

Last Stand at Saber River (MfTV, 1997)

Fighting Apaches from Over the River:

Rio Grande (1950)
Rio Conchos (1964)
Major Dundee (1965)

Characters Named Rio

Jane Russell (Billy the Kid’s romantic interest) in The Outlaw (1943)

Robert Taylor (Anthony Quinn’s foster brother) in Ride, Vaquero (1953)

Marlon Brando in One-Eyed Jacks (1961)

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Ranchos

Rose of the Rancho (1914, 1936)
Rancho Grande (Gene Autry, 1940)
Rancho Notorious (Dietrich, Ferrer, Kennedy, 1952)
Rancho Deluxe (Bridges, Waterston, 1975)

 

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  • Jacob Sorensen

    Interesting that there are so many westerns with “river” or “rio” in the title. Is there common symbolism about what the rivers/rios tend to represent in the movies with them in the title?

    • nickchennault

      Rivers tend to be either boundaries, as the Rio Grande often is, or pathways, as the Columbia is in “Bend of the River” or the Salmon River is in “River of No Return.”